Regent Voyage Spotlight: Grand Pacific Paradise

MIAMI TO SYDNEY

GRAND PACIFIC PARADISE | 66 NIGHTS | DEPARTS OCT 10, 2018

From Miami to Sydney, this unique cruise has a new delight at every turn. Visit Cuba*, transit the Panama Canal, explore tropical and vibrant Central America. Traverse the Pacific Ocean stopping at paradisal islands, where the beaches of the Hawaiian Islands, French Polynesia and the Pacific Rim beckon. Be sure to head to beautiful Hilo Bay Beachfront Park, a black-sand mecca for surfers and canoeing enthusiasts and then compare those waters to the aquamarine beaches and white sands of Lautoka. Cross the International Date Line to reach awe-inspiring New Zealand, to see seemingly impossible landscapes, before arriving in Australia.

Watch from your expansive balcony as the scenery stretches from white sand beaches and idyllic lagoons to breathtaking fjords, luscious rainforests, cosmopolitan cities and tremendous volcanoes.

Spend 66 nights luxuriating in opulent surroundings, enjoying your spacious suite with private balcony, delicious gourmet food from a choice of five restaurants and thoughtful attentive service every day, alongside like-minded world travellers.


VIEW VOYAGE

GRAND PACIFIC PARADISE - MIAMI TO SYDNEY

66 Nights | 10 Oct 2018 | Seven Seas Mariner

Up to 159 FREE Shore Excursions


With Regent Seven Seas Cruises you can Enjoy.... It's all included

  • FREE Unlimted Shore Excursions
  • FREE Pre-paid Gratuities
  • FREE Wifi on board
  • Fine dining & Premium Beverages

  

Cruise Description

66 Night Cruise sailing from Miami to Sydney aboard Seven Seas Mariner.

Seven Seas Mariner is the world's first all-suite, all balcony ship, as well as the first to offer dining by the famed Le Cordon Bleu® of Paris in Signatures, one of four single, open-seating restaurants. Catering to only 700 guests, she is one of the most spacious cruise ships afloat, and, her staff to guest ratio of 1 to 1.6 provides the highest level of personal service in the tradition of Regent Seven Seas.

On just about any night on the Seven Seas Mariner, you'll be tempted to abandon any thoughts of going to bed at a sensible hour. There are dazzling live performances, thrilling games of chance, romantic cabaret acts, hilarious (and sometimes quite talented) Karaoke performances, plus dancing until you have had enough. Need a partner? One of the gentlemen hosts will be honoured to spin you around the floor.

You're on vacation! And with renowned "Above and Beyond" service taking care of every little nuance or housekeeping chore, you can spend your time in more pleasurable pursuits. Enjoy peace of mind knowing your children are not only having fun but are safely attended to. With the Seven Seas Mariner's outstanding 1 to 1.5 guest to crew ratio, you're assured of a matchless level of personal service. So relax!

Highlights of this cruise:

Miami, Florida
Sunny Florida skies, year-round warmth and sunshine, a buzzing nightlife and a mix of cultures define this cosmopolitan city. Celebrity-drenched South Beach attracts people-watchers and the Art Deco District is the largest collection of Art Deco architecture in the world. Tropical style shopping experiences are readily available from Bal Harbor to Lincoln Road and Coconut Grove. Enjoy authentic Cuban cuisine and culture along Calle Ocho or travel back in time with a visit to the historic Venetian Pool. There is something for everyone in this city dubbed the "Gateway to the America's."

George Town, Cayman Islands
Christopher Columbus discovered the Cayman Islands in 1503 and named them Las Tortugas, because the only inhabitants found were turtles. By 1530, they were known as the Caymanas, meaning "crocodile" in Carib. Although Sir Francis Drake visited the islands in 1568, they did not come under British rule until 1670. The Caymanians are descendants of the English, Irish, Scottish and Welsh seamen who settled the islands and later intermarried with Jamaican immigrants.

Cartagena, Colombia
Take a scenic drive through the residential area of Manga, and admire the beautiful mansions built in Republican-style architecture at the end of the 19th century. Explore the Castillo San Felipe de Barajas, a fort that was once the most important military structure built in Latin America. Enjoy a boat ride to the Islas del Rosario, 26 coral islands located off the coast of Isla Barú, and continue to the island of San Martín de Pajarales to visit the aquarium. Enjoy a spectacular dolphin and shark show and other marine attractions there. Board the beautiful Spanish Galleon, a replica of a 17th-century sailing ship, for a cruise of the inner bay of Cartagena.

Golfito, Costa Rica
Golfito is Costa Rica’s most southern port town, located on the Golfo Dulce. Golfito offers some of the most beautiful beaches in Costa Rica with a stunning backdrop of verdant hills and lush rainforest. Relax on a secluded strip of pristine sand, or venture out on the water to take advantage of the excellent sport fishing opportunities. Follow a trail through the densely forested Golfito National Wildlife Refuge to observe rare flora and fauna, and emerge at a scenic outlook with views of the ocean.

Puntarenas, Costa Rica
Puntarenas, which means "Sandy Point" in Spanish, is the capital and main city in the province Puntarenas, Costa Rica, at the Pacific coast. The oddly-shaped province has its largest section in the South, far from the capital. A mountainous country, Costa Rica ranges from sea level to peaks as high as 13,000 feet and a succession of white, sandy beaches follow one another along the Pacific Coast. The country was discovered by Christopher Columbus in 1502.

Corinto, Nicaragua
Explore the town of Corinto surrounded by the pristine cerulean-blue Pacific. Then visit Leon to admire the Leon Cathedral and the artistic treasure trove, Centro de Arte Fundación Ortiz Gurdián. Back in Corinto, be sure to see the Alfonso Cores-Corinto History Museum, Library & Auditorium. Stroll through the lush, tropical Parque Central admiring the handicrafts, locally grown produce and handmade clothing of the vendors lining the streets. Look for souvenirs and locally made hammocks to take home – Nicaraguan hammocks are among the best and most comfortable. Enjoy a fresh seafood meal and a locally brewed beer or cold margarita in a family run restaurant overlooking the sea in this serene island destination.

Puerto Quetzal, Guatemala
Drive into the mountains to beautiful old Antigua, once the country's colonial capital, and discover its lovely bougainvilleadraped buildings and breathtaking views of emerald volcanoes. Travel to famed Lake Atitlan and step back in time as you encounter the indigenous people in all their finery still living along the lakeshore. Or better yet, fly to Flores and experience the magnificent and enigmatic Mayan temples and palaces of the Tikal complex, surrounded by jungle.

Acapulco, Mexico
Acapulco, nicknamed "Pearl of the Pacific," is Mexico's most glamorous pacific resort. Located on a deep, semi-circular bay, Acapulco is located southwest of Mexico City. Few destinations can match its superb weather with an average of 360 days of sunshine per year and with temperatures comfortably in the 80s. Acapulco was important as a port city for Spanish galleons sailing between Spain and the Orient long before it was "discovered" as a vacation playground.

Cabo San Lucas, Mexico
Twenty years ago Cabo San Lucas, at the southernmost tip of Baja, was little more than a fishing village occasionally visited by itinerant Californian surfers and sport fishermen with the means to sail in or fly down. In recent years, however, it has rapidly become the focal point of Los Cabos, the catch-all term for the beaches and resorts ringing the toe of the peninsula. Condos have sprung up, palms transplanted, water piped in and everything is kept pristine.

San Diego, California
The focus of San Diego seems to be ever changing, and each change adds to the city’s complexity and attractiveness. The city began as a remote Spanish mission and later came to be dominated by navy and marine bases. More recently, San Diego has established itself as a leader in scientific research and as a near perfect place to live, retire, conduct business or visit as a tourist. Its year-round perfect climate also helps lure people to its historic attractions.

Kahului, United States
Explore Kahalui Maui, on Hawaii’s Valley Island with its natural treasures on land and sea including Mt. Haleakala Crater, Iao Park Needle Mountain, and spectacular beaches for swimming, diving and surfing. Head to Lahaina on the westward side of the island and visit the magnificent world-famous banyan tree in front of the Old Courthouse building. Browse mile-long Front Street with its shops, galleries, whaling history museum, and restaurants. Stop for a refreshing shave ice. Look for unique souvenirs like Maui’s famous “Kitchen Cooked” potato chips, coffee, and leis. Back in Kahalui visit the Maui Arts and Cultural Center. Enjoy a meal of Hawaiian pig, poi, or fresh seafood in this lush and naturally luxurious tropical settings.

Honolulu, Hawaii
Honolulu is both the capital and most populated city of Hawaai. In the Hawaiian language, honolulu means "sheltered bay" or "place of shelter." The city was settled by Polynesian migrants, but it is not known when they first made the area their home. The turbulent late 19th century and early 20th century saw the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy, Hawaii's subsequent annexation by the United States, and the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, all keeping Honolulu the main seaport of the Hawaiian Islands.

Hilo, Hawaii
Situated on the Big Island of Hawaii, Hilo greets guests in its historic downtown area, packed with restaurants and shops. As beaches are high on any visitor’s list, be sure to head to beautiful Hilo Bay Beachfront Park, a black-sand mecca for surfers and canoeing enthusiasts. Other local attractions include Pana'ewa Zoo, the only rainforest zoo in the United States; Nani Mau Gardens, where a tram ride takes you past such highlights as the iron bell tower and lovely orchid pavilion. Spectacular day trips are available, from volcano tours to kayaking adventures to trips to hiking tours in Akaka Falls State Park.

Nuku Hiva, French Polynesia
While Nuku Hiva has been inhabited by Polynesian explorers since 150 BC, western visitors who have been enthralled by this gem of French Polynesia include Jack London, Robert Louis Stevenson, Herman Melville and Paul Gauguin. The largest of the Marquesas Islands, Nuku Hiva is a beautiful volcanic island with mountains topping 3,700 feet high, with jagged walls that suddenly plunge into the immense ocean below. Melville called it “a country that no description could fit the beauty”. Discover waterfalls and rivers and stone “tiki” statues hidden in the forest. In Hakaui, view the third biggest waterfall in the world. A delicious local specialty is roast pork, cooked on hot rocks buried in the sand. Please be advised that due to the under-developed nature of this destination, organized tours are not available.

Fakarava, French Polynesia
Fakarava is an atoll in the west of the Tuamotu group in French Polynesia. It is the second largest of the Tuamotu atolls. Fakarava’s main village is called Rotoava.The first recorded European to arrive to Fakarava Atoll was Russian oceanic explorer Fabian Gottlieb von Bellingshausen in 1820 on the ships Vostok and Mirni. He originally named this atoll "Wittgenstein."

Bora Bora, French Polynesia
Bora Bora lies 150 miles northwest of Tahiti in the Society Islands. The main island, home to 4,225 inhabitants, is in the center of a multicolored lagoon, surrounded by offshore "motu" islets inside a protective coral necklace. Its lagoon is world-famous for its beauty. A partially paved road circles the island, passing colorful villages, archeological sites, and old Army bunkers and cannons left over from WWII, when 5,000 American GIs made a "friendly invasion."

Raiatea, French Polynesia
Raiatea and Taha'a are two separate islands sharing the same lagoon. Located 120 miles northwest of Tahiti, between Huahine and Bora Bora among the leeward Society Islands, Raiatea is the second largest island of French Polynesia after Tahiti. The island tour reveals lush green valleys, numerous waterfalls, and pineapple and vanilla plantations. Discover fascinating under-water scenery within Raiatea's deep lagoon, rich with fish and surrounded by mountains.

Moorea, French Polynesia
Moorea, often likened to James Michener's mythical island of Bali Hai, is only 11 miles from Tahiti. Many visitors say it is worth the visit just to see Moorea's spectacular bays. The volcanic peaks, reflected in the waters of Cook's Bay and Opunohu Bay, rise like a shark's jaw from the island's base. Sharks sighting on nearly every dive makes this island a popular diving destination. At times a tuna will come by or dolphins will be heard clicking just out of sight.

Papeete, Tahiti
The islands of Polynesia are a gorgeous collection of volcanic islands and atolls strewn lazily across the grand Pacific Ocean. The island of Tahiti proper is the largest of the 118 islands and atolls that comprise French Polynesia. Papeete, the modern capital of Tahiti and her islands, contains government offices, hospitals, banks and many other services dedicated to serving the islands as well as tourists who come to these islands for a life-enriching experience.

Raiatea, French Polynesia
Raiatea and Taha'a are two separate islands sharing the same lagoon. Located 120 miles northwest of Tahiti, between Huahine and Bora Bora among the leeward Society Islands, Raiatea is the second largest island of French Polynesia after Tahiti. The island tour reveals lush green valleys, numerous waterfalls, and pineapple and vanilla plantations. Discover fascinating under-water scenery within Raiatea's deep lagoon, rich with fish and surrounded by mountains.

Bora Bora, French Polynesia
Bora Bora lies 150 miles northwest of Tahiti in the Society Islands. The main island, home to 4,225 inhabitants, is in the center of a multicolored lagoon, surrounded by offshore "motu" islets inside a protective coral necklace. Its lagoon is world-famous for its beauty. A partially paved road circles the island, passing colorful villages, archeological sites, and old Army bunkers and cannons left over from WWII, when 5,000 American GIs made a "friendly invasion."

Pago Pago, Samoa
Located on Tutuila, the largest of the Samoan islands in the South Pacific Ocean, Pago Pago is the capital of American Samoa. First settled by the Polynesians around 600 BC, the islands became a territory of the US in 1900. An important coaling station and naval base, the Pago Pago harbor proved to be of strategic importance during World War II. Today its beauty and ecological diversity make it a popular tourist destination.

Apia, Western Samoa
Samoa is made up of nine islands about 1700 miles north east of New Zealand. The islands were originally settled about 1000 BC by a thriving Polynesian culture. In Apia, explore the colorful Maketi Fou (food market) on Fugalei Street, and the flea market – the perfect souvenir haunt where you’ll find everything from clubs and kava bowls to Samoan sarongs, baskets, and jewelry. Discover alluring blue lagoons, serene tropical beaches, cascading waterfalls, and lush rainforests. On Mount Vaea lies the beautifully restored home of author Robert Louis Stevenson. Tempt your taste buds with ocean-fresh fish wrapped in banana leaves and cooked in an umu , an earth oven of hot stones.

Suva, Fiji
Located on the southeast coast of the island of Viti Levu, Suva is the capital city of Fiji. As the largest urban area in the South Pacific outside of Australia and New Zealand, it is Fiji’s main port city, and the commercial and political center of Fiji. The city hosted the 2003 South Pacific Games, being the third time in the event's history that they had been held in Suva.

Lautoka, Fiji
The Fiji archipelago consists of tiny coral atolls and mountainous forest-clad islands of volcanic origin, and is famed for its aquamarine waters and white sand beaches. Lautoka, meaning “spear-hit” or “hit to win,” was named that as a result of an argument between two chiefs. It is sited in the western side of the largest island in Fiji. The city is surrounded with the blue Pacific Ocean on the western side and green gold sugar cane and pine trees on the other sides.

Norfolk Island, Australia
Dramatic cliffs accented by majestic pines overlook turquoise lagoons and emerald golfing greens on this pristine island between Australia and New Zealand. Admire the natural beauty of the parks and reserves, and relax on the peaceful crescent-shaped beach of Emily’s Bay. For a historical perspective, visit the monument to Captain Cook, overlooking the place where Cook is said to have landed on the island, and learn about the island’s former penal colony on a tour of Old Kingston Town.

Auckland, New Zealand
Auckland, “The City Of Sails”, is spread over a narrow isthmus between the sparkling waters of the Waitemata and Manukau Harbours on New Zealand’s North Island. It earns its sobriquet from having more boats per capita than any other city in the world. The first settlers here were the Maori, and are still a vibrant component of its cosmopolitan population. Auckland offers the visitor all the amenities of a world-class city. Browse the shops of Queen Street or the Parnell area with its galleries and boutiques in quaintly restored Victorian buildings. For a magnificent panorama of the city travel to Mount Eden, the city’s highest point, or visit the Skytower for loftier views. Minutes from downtown you can relax on a black sand beach, or explore the America’s Cup Yachting Village. Further afield there are the spectacular pine-clad Waitakere Mountains, the amazing Waitomo Glowworm Caves and the verdant vineyards of Kumeu River Wines.

Rotorua (Tauranga), New Zealand
Tauranga is the center of a large citrus and sub tropical fruit-growing area and is a favorite base for deep-sea anglers. Across the harbor is the major port for the region, Mt Maunganui, which is also the major overseas outlet for the vast timber industry established in the center of the North Island. Tauranga has become a rendezvous for thousands of holiday makers to whom the lure of its sun-baked sands and sparkling waters prove an irresistible attraction.

Gisborne, New Zealand
This charming seaside community was named in honor of the crew member aboard Captain James Cook’s ship Endeavour who first sighted land in the area in 1769. Not only boasting a long maritime history and a vibrant Maori heritage and culture, Gisborne is also known for its wine, often called the “Chardonnay Capital of New Zealand.” Be sure to visit Gisborne’s splendid array of boutique wineries. And for a taste of Gisborne’s history and art, the Tairawhiti Museum is an essential destination in this city of warm smiles and even warmer hearts.

Wellington, New Zealand
Stroll past Victorian Gothic buildings, visit the exquisite Botanic Gardens, take the cable car up the mountain for a fantastic view, or head for the city beach. Journey around the spectacular harbor with its amazing views and visit a sheep or cattle station. See some of the sites where the Lord of the Rings trilogy was filmed. Shopping: Shop for arts and crafts, jewelry, fine woolens, and leather goods. Shop for arts and crafts, jewelry, fine woolens, and leather goods. Enjoy a variety of continental dishes in addition to succulent lamb and seafood.

Christchurch (Lyttelton), New Zealand
Christchurch is the largest city of the South Island. Sprawling out across the Canterbury Plains, Christchurch was incorporated as a city in 1862. It was named after the Oxford College attended by John Robert Godley, leader of the settlers arriving in the first four ships to Christchurch. It is a charming city, a garden city with many parks within its boundaries. The city has a backdrop of the Southern Alps and long, ocean beaches are only a short drive away.

Dunedin, New Zealand
This charming city lies at the head of a fiord-like inlet and is surrounded by seven hills. In the early days, Dunedin was the largest and wealthiest city in the country, thanks mainly to the gold fields. It has been responsible for many firsts: the first to have gaslight, water mains, hydro power and steam trams. Discover the rugged, beautiful Otago Peninsula, filled with geological wonders, and gaze in awe at the great albatross with its ten-foot wingspan. Keep an eye out for fur seals on the rocks and perhaps some yellow-eyed penguins. Visit Larnach Castle, a historic 19th-century property surrounded by gardens and splendid views. It is often said that Dunedin is the most perfectly preserved Victorian City anywhere. Explore historic Dunedin with its splendid Victorian and Edwardian stone buildings. Look for delightful local crafts, artwork, wool and leather items among the souvenirs. Enjoy a wide variety of cuisines as well as lamb and seafood.

Burnie, Australia
Located on the northwest coast of Tasmania, Burnie was originally settled in 1827 as “Emu Bay.” The town was later renamed after William Burnie, a director of the Van Diemen’s Land Company. The first settlers literally carved a village out from the rain forests and tea-tree swamps that occupied the area. After mineral deposits were discovered in Tasmania, the town prospered. In the late 30s, Burnie’s industry bloomed even more when Associated Pulp and Paper Mills Limited began large production.

Melbourne, Australia
Far from the clichéd Australia of popular perception, Melbourne is a graceful city of European style and substance, fine living and cultural riches. Its many green parks and public gardens reflect the foresight of this city's 19th century founders and their intention to create a "pleasing to the eye" metropolis for the enjoyment of all. The city's moderate climate and financial prominence have attracted huge numbers of visitors from all over the world.

Geelong, Australia
Located on the shores of Corio Bay, vibrant Geelong is the second-largest city in Victoria, on Australia’s southern coast. Its name originates from the Aboriginal word for bay - jillong. Founded in 1802, the city became a thriving industrial center after the 1850’s gold rush. The modern tourist can visit the vibrant, renovated waterfront, the Art Deco Eastern Beach or take a drive along the dramatic beaches of the Great Ocean Road.

Eden, Australia
Formerly a whaling hub in the 19th century, Eden is the southernmost town in New South Wales, nestled between two glorious bays and perched on rolling hills bounded by dramatic cliffs and expansive sandy beaches. Eden’s whaling legacy lives on in its exciting whale-watching opportunities and the fascinating Killer Whale Museum. At the Sapphire Coast Marine Discovery Centre, towering lighthouses and the scenic coastline keep the focus firmly on the ever-changing sea.

Sydney, Australia
One of the liveliest, must-see cities of the Pacific Rim, Sydney humbly began life as a British penal colony in 1788. Among the colorful characters in its early history was William Bligh of Mutiny on the Bounty fame who was deposed as governor during the Rum Rebellion of 1808. In 1852, with the discovery of gold in the interior, Sydney became a thriving port of the Victorian Empire. Today, Sydney looks to the future, its skyline crowned by the graceful billowing sails of its famed Opera House. Visitors can get a glimpse of the past along the narrow, twisting streets of the Rocks, Sydney’s restored historical district and for the adventurous, the Sydney bridge climb will reward you with panoramic views of the city and harbor. Excursions can reveal the spectacular, untamed beauty of the Blue Mountains with a ride on the worlds steepest perpendicular railway; or get up close and personal with Australia’s charming wildlife at the Koala Park Sanctuary, then end your day with a refreshing stop at a traditional Aussie pub.